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. but near the end of her employment, she was told her clothing was tight, and distracting. mrs. nelson and her attorney are joining me by phone. ms. nelson thank you for coming on. >> you welcome, thanks for having me. >> you said it's been a tough couple of years, an interesting couple of years. you worked there for ten years, what changed? >> i have no idea. i thought everything was still the aim. i went to the work the same as i did every day, worked hard. enjoyed my job and one day it just came to a screeching halt. >> okay so what was your relationship? did you have a relationship with your boss other than a professional one? >> i would say probably we had more of a relationship. but i had a relationship with the rest of his family. and so did he with me over the -- >> i mean, you were not having an affair with your boss? >> absolutely not. i'm happily married. >> okay, so the court said in its decision, that it may be unfair but it's not unlawful. how do you feel about that? >> um, it's tough. i really struggle witt yet, you know, i don't think it's fair. i don't think it's right
to recognize mrs. coleman for her many years of service and her contributions which have enriched and strengthened our communities. mrs. coleman brings a lifetime of experience to her current position to the united auto workers, a career which began in july of 1967 in the u.a.w.'s women's department. carolyn's skill and knowledge led her to be selected to premiere assignments. she directly assisted many great union leaders in their important work. including u.a.w. vice president's dick shoemaker, and carl raveson, as well as u.a.w. president owen bieber, and treasurer dennis rayhams, her current supervisor. her work is impeccable. her advice valued. and her friendship treasured. carolyn was one of the many unsung heroes of the labor movement. she was never the one who gained headlines for making fiery speeches that inspired the masses or received credit for major agreements that have lifted so many working families into the prosperous middle class, but behind the scenes she contributed to both. for 45 years carolyn coleman reported to work for the united auto workers with one simp
, for her introduction of this bill and her comments honoring the memory of mr. kling. he truly was a caring, a compassionate and a loyal person and a loyal friend that made everyone who crossed his path feel as though they were the most special person he knew. finally, mr. speaker, when we announced that legislation to rename this facility at the facility, there was some veterans standing out in front waiting to go in. and they asked what the hubbub was about. they asked why all the tv cameras and i explained to them who bill kling was and why this was being done. they were grateful to know and veterans just like those veterans when they walk through the front door, will not only learn about bill kling but his example for continuing to work hard every single day for his fellow veterans. what a great honor we're bestoge on his family and by -- destowing on his family. -- bestowing on his family. i ask my colleagues to support this bill honoring this great american. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from florida. mr. miller: i have no further speakers. the speaker pro tempo
or does the gentlelady reserve her time? mrs. davis: i'm sorry, mr. speaker. i reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman reserves the balance of her time. the gentleman from california. mr. mckeon: thank you, mr. speaker. i rise to thank the gentlelady for her leadership not only on this issue but on the leadership she helps provide to our committee. we have several women serving on the house arm services committee, and they do an outstanding job. over the years, many of us have visited iraq and afghanistan, and i have had that opportunity, but i know that the troops that the women have made bring us back a different perspective. i know the troops that i made, like time before last to afghanistan i went to the south. i went to camp leather neck where they were setting up the marines that just arrived and they were pushing out in the desert. we were not able to visit marja, which was one of the towns in that area. was totally under the control of the taliban. the taliban flag flew over marja. the last time i was there, totally changed. the marines had taken
, mrs. obama joined her husband to wish a merry christmas. >> after a decade of war, our heroes are coming home. across america, military families are reunited. let's give thanks for our men and women and let's give a special prayer to those in afghanistan, risking their lives. >> this is the fifth first family christmas in hawaii since president obama was elected. >>> bringing holiday cheer to people who need it the most. >> and you heard of 3d tv but how about 3d printer? how one group is using the device to create weapons at home.  >>> this is the kind of story we love to tell during the holiday season. paying it forward to people who could use a little bit of help. >> that's what happened to a virginia student who is working as a waitress to pay for the holiday season. >> here is what happened during one of her shift. >> reporter: they came, they aid and they tip bombed. what's a tip bomb? it's a surprisingly huge tip for a waitress. >> i was shocked. >> reporter: and he is not even the waiters. he is the first one to tell you that servers earn thei
states senate i will present this pin to mrs. inouye in honor of her husband, our gift to her because he gave so many gifts to us. he was a line in the senate, a real american hero. though gent until style he was a fears warrior when it came to fighting for his nation or standing up for hawaii. when he received his medal of honor, he was rising to the call of pearl har bob volunteering to serve his country. putting aside his dreams of being a physician. he was decorated in world war ii for saving his own soldiers. he was a devoted, dedicated public servant. he was hawaii's first representative of the nation's newest state. he was the first person of japanese heritage to be elected to the senate. imagine he knew what it was like to break bar yes, sir and boundaries. when he came to the senate he cherished his love for hawaii and its people. he fought to improve their lives. his style was one of absolute civilty. he believed the decorum of the senate enabled the senate to do the people's business. he was the essence of civilty and he showed that often goodmanners was good politics that led
to rename this ira the kay bailey hutchison spousal ira in her honor, and i hope, mr. president, we can join together and honor senator hutchison by getting that done before we close out our business this year. kay, of course, has always championed the state sales tax deduction, which may not seem like a big deal to others in this carriage carriages but it . but it is a big deal in texas. we don't have a state income tax. but we do pay a state sales tax. and of course kay has also worked to reduce the marriage penalty tax. she's been a strong defender of taxpayer interests and her efforts have made the tax code less hostile to saving and to families. she alluded to her great work with nasa. she's one of the senate's leading supporters of nasa and human space flight, and of course gnaws i nasa has contribd historic technological breakthroughs that have benefited all americans. kay appreciated the importance of basic scientific research to long-term american prosperity and she appreciates the role that nasa has played in fostering innovation. she's long said and advocated for support for nasa
of the public eye for a few days. mrs. obama joined her husband in his weekly address to wish all americans a merry christmas. >> after a decade of war, our heroes are coming home. all across america, military families are reuniting. so this week, let's give thanks for our veterans and their families and let's say a prayer for all our troops, especially those in afghanistan, who are spending this holiday season overseas, risking their lives to defend the freedoms that we hold so dear. >> this is the first family's fifth christmas in hawaii since mr. obama was elected president. hawaii's not a bad place to be right about now, especially when you consider how cold it is out here, gwen! >> today's not going to be all bad, wisdom. >> oh, really? >> no, it's not, trust me. yesterday, we had really gusty winds, creating very significant wind chills. let's take a look at some of those numbers. yesterday's wind gusts at national were at 43. 44 at baltimore. look, 51 at dulles, unbelievable. it did make it feel a lot colder than it actually was. 45 degrees, yesterday's high at dc, right where we sho
it is a bit of a convenient timing. mrs. clinton hasn't been seen in public. her health is badly compromised, i hope she is getting medical attention. i don't know if she has gone to the hospital. it doesn't look like she has. but does this mean she will testify after she leaves office, margie? >> i don't think this is convenient timing. she has gone to over 100 countries as secretary of state. i feel nauseous hearing about her schedule. i take her at her word. if there is anybody who would not be afraid to testify in front of congress it's hillary clinton. >> laura: why do you say that? >> because she has been through so much. she has continued to get back out there and face will thats. personal and professional for decades. fearlessly and courageously. >> what does that have to do with benghazi. i'm not trying to be difficult here. forget the testimony for a moment, right? she could have at any point in time after the benghazi attack after the susan rice fiasco she could have done a press conference maybe 20 or 30 minutes and answered questions. i'm going to testify for congress when we le
know, the media has already crowned her the 2016 democratic frontrunner. but many are now wondering if she will ever get around to testifying about libya marjorie omero is a democratic strategist joining us now. after we talked about mrs. clinton last thursday and i laid on that line with the immaculate concussion giving full credit to one of my tweets. one of mrs. clinton's top aides emailed me on christmas eve and said look, mrs. clinton, i'm shocked that you would kind of joke about. this she really did fall and she really has been advised to take bed rest. i will take them at their word but nevertheless in the eyes of a lot of people it is a bit of a convenient timing. mrs. clinton hasn't been seen in public. her health is badly compromised, i hope she is getting medical attention. i don't know if she has gone to the hospital. it doesn't look like she has. but does this mean she will testify after she leaves office, margie? >> i don't think this is convenient timing. she has gone to over 100 countries as secretary of state. i feel nauseous hearing about her schedule. i take her
of the united states senate, i will present this pin to mrs. inouye in honor of her husband. our gift to her because he gave so many gifts to us. he was a lion in the senate, a real american hero. though gentle in style, he was a fierce warrior when it came to fighting for his nation or standing up for hawaii. when he received his medal of honor, he was rising to the call of the sirens at pearl harbor, volunteering to serve his country, putting aside his own dreams to be a physician. but he went on to be a healer of many wounds. he was decorated in world war ii for saving his fellow soldiers. my experience with senator inouye as a friend was that he was a devoted, dedicated public servant. he was hawaii's first representative of the nation's newest state. he was the first person of japanese heritage ever to be elected to the senate. imagine. he himself knew what it was like to break barriers and to break boundaries. when he came to the senate, he cherished his love for hawaii and its people. he fought tirelessly to improve their lives. now his style was one of absolute civility. he was the
to the house that she has on her agenda. mr. sessions: the gentleman is correct and we expect those. mr. woodall: this is the kind of house, deliberative house, i came to be part of two short years ago. we have the ability to get these things done in the next few days. i reject the idea that i read over and over again that this house has been delaying action this house got it right wetch got it right in a budget in april of 2011, we got it right in our budget in 2012, we got it right when we passed aest sequester replacement and we're getting it right with this rule today. with that, i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady from new york. ms. slaughter: i'm pleased to yield one minute to the gentlelady from california, our leader, ms. pelosi. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady is recognized for one minute. ms. pelosi: thank you very much, madam chair. ranking member. thank you, mr. speaker. why did i sort of smell smoke when i heard this debate? it's reminiscent of nero fiddling while rome burned. the american people are waiting for us to get the
states senate, i present this pin to mrs. inouye in honor of her husband because she gave so many gifts to us. he was a lion in the senate, a real american hero. he was a fierce warrior when it came to fighting for his nation or standing up for hawaii. he received his medal of honor to his wife and pearl harbor. .. he cherished his love for hawaii and its people. now his style was one of absolute stability. he was the one who believed that believe that the decorum of the senate enabled the senate to do the peoples business. he was the essence of stability and he showed that often good manners was good politics that led to good politics. he did not argue the loudest and instead he worked diligently. he marshaled his arguments and with quiet determination he won the day. has a former appropriator i saw that he really got through the air marks. he loved in mark's and what did he do with those earmarks? i can tell you. he made sure that we looked after indian tribes. he made sure we looked after the poorest of the poor in hawaii. his superfund site that had been left by his legacy and he ma
looking people. >> andrea: not for humility. >> juan: mr. sensitivity here. >> kimberly: i feel bad for her. i can see in the photo is picture of a child. she is a mom. apparently she is quite attractive head to toe if you know what i mean. the dentist admitted to his wife or did something that the wife caught on to it or didn't like to way the woman looked. quite sexy. why are you shaking your head? >> greg: this is a plot line from l.a. line episode for 20 years ago. this is how you -- all you do is go back and look at the old tv sears on law and go to court. it works every time. this is women on women sexism. the man has nothing to do with it. the wife is saying i had enough of this. get out. having said that, there is more discrimination against the homely than there are against the hot. i wonder how many women lost their jobs to this woman because they weren't attractive enough. think about that, america. >> kimberly: that was interesting. part of the problem is that he said her clothes were too tight, too sexy, too revealing and that was a problem for him to be able -- actuall
the shooter was beginning his rampage. luke's teacher tried to protect her kids. so you're in the classroom and mrs. mckenzie, is she calm? is she excited? how was she? >> she was crying. >> reporter: mrs. mckenzie was crying? >> yeah. >> reporter: because it must have been pretty scary. >> yeah. but then like our next door teacher said to come to her classroom. >> reporter: so you all went in this? >> yeah, because probably the gunman was going to come in our classroom. i don't know. >> reporter: fortunately for luke and his classmates the gunman never made it to their classroom. but even as they were ushered to safety at a nearby firehouse, the kids were very scared. and luke bravely wanted to help calm them. >> they're crying and i'm like, it's okay. my dad is a cop. he'll like help us. >> reporter: his dad, luke ramirez, is a police officer in the neighboring town of oxford. and he did come. he was one of the first responders on the scene. >> he grabbed me, actually. and i said, oh, i said, you're finally here. what took you so long? >> reporter: it was a happy ending for the santana fa
. the presiding officer: the senator from mississippi. mr. cochran: mr. president, we wish to thank the distinguished manager of the bill for her courtesies and for her skill in managing this bill. her sensitivity to the need for improvements and sustaining the disaster assistance capabilities of our great country. thank you. mr. paul: mr. president? the presiding officer: the senator from kentucky. mr. paul: i ask unanimous consent to call up amendments 3376 and 3410 en bloc. the presiding officer: the clerk will report the amendments. the clerk: the senator from kentucky, mr. paul, proposes amendment numbered 3376 and 3410 en bloc. mr. paul: mr. president, when hurricane sandy struck, hundreds -- when hurricane sandy struck the northeast, hundreds of thousands, if not millions of people were without power. we all saw the video footage, we saw the terrible trauma and people are still trying to dig out from underneath the debris of hurricane sandy. during that period of time, hundreds of workers drove up from the south wanting to help. these workers were nonunionized and they were t
as the national intelligence officer for russia at the national intelligence council. her upcoming book is titled "mr. putin: operative in the kremlin." welcome to you both. fiona hill, is this even about adopted children at all or is this about a more confrontational stance towards the united states? >> well, it is now about adopted children which, of course, the story makes very clear. but it's come out of really campaign politics on both sides of the united states and in russia. mr. putin first actually survived a bruising campaign to become president again in spite of the fact that everybody saw him as a shoe-in and as part of that campaign he did ratchet up anti-american sentiment. he blamed protests that took place around the elections for the russian parliament and around the presidential elections, many thousands of people out in the streets in moscow and elsewhere, he blamed those on the u.s. support. he's taken punitive action against u.s. n.g.o.s. he's declared many non-governmental organizations in russia that received foreign funding, especially funding to the united states to be for
: the gentlewoman reserves the balance of her time. the gentleman from texas. mr. smith: madam speaker, i yield as much time as he may consume to the gentleman from oklahoma, mr. cole, who is the sponsor of this legislation. the speaker pro tempore: the chair recognizes the gentleman from oklahoma. mr. cole: i thank you, madam speaker, and i thank the gentleman for yielding. and i would like to ask, madam speaker, at the appropriate time if i could submit a written statement on this particular piece of legislation. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. mr. cole: i had a long oration i was going to make but i want to be quite honest. my good friend, chairman smith, and my good friend, chairman lofgren, have covered the case well or better than i can. they're both drished -- distinguished attorneys. they understand the intricacies involved here. so there's no need for me to go through and repeat the points that they've made. i do want to make one central point or two points. first i want to thank both of them. this is a matter of justice. this is a bipartisan effort, to try and make sure th
ted cruise will fill her seat in congress. mr. cruz won the november election against paul sadler with just over 56% of the vote. in early november kansas senator jerry moran appointed him chairman of the senate yull committee. >> senator inouye passed way on monday at the edge of 88. he was serving his nineth term in office after winning re-election in 2010. he lost his right arm in combat in world war ii and received the medal of honor from bill clinton. senator reid paid tribute to the late senator. riendship i value so very, very much. he was a colleague but really a friend. he helped me so many times, helped me do my best here, my best has been with the help of him. as i mentioned briefly yesterday, he always had so much confidence in me. years ago, years ago when i was a senator struggling, like all senators here, he told me two decades ago that i would be running the senate someday. i never even contemplated, thought about that, desired that. things have worked out that he was right. senator inouye is one of the finest men i have ever known. a real american hero. my friend
the evidence prove? and frankly, her lawyer, mr. bill cherry, is one of the finest attorneys in ft. lauderdale. he has the right to investigate this matter. and while being in the netherlands by itself is an innocuous fact, why aren't they answering these questions? >> that's not true. >> the trail of evidence will lead him to the end result, and if it's innocuous and there really is no mr. aguilar living and alive today, come forward and answer these questions. why can't they tell us what's going on? maybe there's more to the story, and that's why they're not coming forward. but the bottom line is this needs to be investigated, and jamie, as a surviving wife, has the right to know what the truth is concerning her husband. harris: tad? >> well, the bottom line here is if they're hiding money, it's easy to follow a paper trail of money. and this situation is no different than any other paper trail. also how hard would it be to get an investigator in the netherlands to look around, follow the money trail and see if they see anything that doesn't look proper? the bottom line is the only thing tha
to her. >> ticket, mr. speaker. i thank the gentleman for yielding. i rise in support of his resolution to condemn the act of a lone gunman in newtown, connecticut, and to offer condolences of the family members and members of the community. i join him in saluting the courage of the teachers and administrators who gave their lives to save the children in their care. to thank the first responders to a live on the scene who not only got survivors to safety but to end the succession of killings happening. those first responders leave their home every day knowing they are going to face danger and they did that day as well. in the face of it, they were heroic, as were the teachers and counselors. this is all the meat to cook -- this has all been laid clear to us. congressman murphy, senator collect murphy, who represents this district would such a distinction and compassion. congressman courtney, congressman john larson, jim hines. all of them spoke with such beauty at our service earlier. the candlelight service. it was so moving to hear their connection to the people there. the president s
passion, i hope that her passion for social justice is an inspiration to all of us. thank you, mr. speaker, and i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady yields back. for what purpose does the gentleman from maryland seek recognition? mr. cummings: to address the house for one minute. the speaker pro tempore: does the gentleman ask for unanimous consent? mr. cummings: yes. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, so ordered. mr. cummings: thank you very much. today i'm incredibly pleased to congratulate my dear colleague for her aessential to the chair of the senate appropriations committee. the senator's commitment to our great state is undeniable. she has worked tirelessly throughout her prestigious career to serve her fellow marylanders first as a social worker and now as one of the most influential members of the united states senate. the senator is a leader that maryland and truly our nation can be proud of. she was the first woman elected to the senate who was not preceded by her husband or father and has continued breaking barriers ever since. t
rampage. luke's teacher tried to protect her kids. so you're in the classroom, and mrs. mckenzie is -- is she calm is she excited? how was she? >> she was crying. >> reporter: mrs. mckenzie was crying? >> yeah. >> reporter: because it must have pretty scary. >> yeah. but then like our next door teacher said to come to her classroom. >> reporter: so you all went in there? >> yeah because probably the gunman was going to come in our classroom. >> reporter: fortunately for luke and his classmates the gunman never made it to their classroom. but even as they were ushered to safety at a nearby fire house, the kids were very scared. and luke bravely wanted to help calm them. >> they were crying. i was like, it's okay. my dad is a cop and he'll like help us. >> reporter: his dad, luke ramirez, is a police officer in the neighboring town of oxford. and he did come. he was one of the first responders on the scene. >> i saw my husband was calling. i picked up the phone right away. and i hear the terror in his voice telling me something terrible happened. you have t
hillary clinton will be back at work next week. mrs. clinton has been recovering at home from aen concussion. an aide tells us she's looking forward to resuming her schedule. >>> we're going to turn this evening now to the nation's increasingly divisive gun control debate, just a day after we showed you this scene in los angeles. people lining up in their cars to participate in a one-day gun buy-back program. that etch fort brought in more than 2,000 firearms in exchange for gift certificates. but barely two weeks after the newtown, connecticut, school shootings, another debate heating up about whether to bring guns into schools. a new poll suggests 64% of americans think arming at least one school official would be at least some what effective. but what about arming the teachers? abc's cecilia vega tonight with some of those teachers who say yes. >> okay, so, now what do i do? >> reporter: the gun is fake, but these utah teachers fear the threat facing their classrooms is very real. today, 200 of those teachers became students -- >> ready to fire. >> reporter: packing a conferen
, in short, that america has always been grateful to have especially in her darkest hours. men who lead by example and expect nothing. >> mr. inouye died yesterday of respiratory complications. he was 88. >>> a new offer from president obama aimed at avoiding the "fiscal cliff." he met with house speaker john boehner at the white house yesterday. the president reportedly offered to curtail future cost of living increases for recipients of social security and softened his demand for higher taxes at upper income levels. boehner wants an earnings threshold of a million dollars for higher rates. if no deal is reached in the next two weeks, billions in tax hikes and spending cuts will go into effect. >>> well, millions of credit card customers should soon receive refunds from american express, capital one, and discover. the three companies owe $435 million in refunds to nearly 6 million customers as a result of a government crackdown on deceptive credit card practices. refunds range from 3 bucks to $300 and they should show up on monthly statements. >> youtube released its list of top 10 tre
allies. >> reporter: in private, there was tension. reagan urged her to negotiate, but she wanted victory. mrs. thatcher said "she was sure that the president would act in the same way if alaska had been threatened." to get what she wanted, the iron lady used her softer side. "dear ron," she writes, "i think you are the only person who will understand the significance of what i'm trying to say." >> very personal. >> absolutely. >> reporter: mrs. that th thatcher's charm offense worked and they remained friends long after they left power. nbc news, london. >>> an elementary school crush blossoms into true love. we'll tell you about a roman more than 20 years in the making. cue the music. first, this is "today" on nbc. >>> still to come, a record number of holiday gifts are expected to be returned this year. where some of those end up might surprise you. >>> plus, we'll look back at 75 years of "weekend today." >>> live pictures right now. it's a calm and quiet start to the day. get ready. we have some snow and rain moving in. so far, the area already seeing a dusting. we're going to check
with mrs. clinton for a chat about her future. >> what most people are asking now about you is, will you consider running for president in 2016? would you just like to make your declaration now and we can conclude this interview. >> that would be fascinating to me, as well as everyone else. i've said i really don't believe that that's something i will do again. i am so grateful i had the experience of doing it before. but i think there are lots of ways to serve. so i will continue to serve. >> what would it take to convince you to run in 2016? >> that's all hypothetical, because right now i have no intention of running. >> we also wondered after four years at her post as secretary of state, what keeps her up at night? what worries you the most? >> iran. iran worries me the most. because it's not only the terrible prospect that they might have a nuclear weapon, they're already engaging in terrorism all over the world, directly through their own agents, using others like hezbollah. >> what about here? could they attack us here? >> well, remember, they had a plot to murder the saudi ambassa
." because she was in her doughnut hole. well, a couple weeks later, mrs. johnson would be back in the hospital. how wasteful is that? how -- why? why is that -- that costs a tremendous amount of money to our system. this is saving money. this is health care reform. this is medicare reform. it's improving people's health and saving money at the same time. so we have increased benefits, we've extended the life of medicare. that was done as part of health care reform. that is medicare reform. now, in the election, we had a discussion about this. there were a lot of ads about it. we know what governor romney would have done to medicare. he said very explicitly that -- and, again, the presiding officer has quoted this. he said very explicitly he would restore those billions and billions of dollars in overpayments to private insurance companies for no reason, for no good effect, just so that i guess these insurance companies could have more profit. instead, we reinvested this money into medicare. but he would have given it to the insurance companies. he would have replaced the health
for the president because he is generally very active but he is in good spirits. meanwhile, mrs. bush, who is 87, has been making two trips a day here to visit her husband. willie, at this point there is no timeline set for the former president's release. back to you. >> janet shamlian, thanks i know we add our name to the long list of people wishing the president well. >>> after what's been a disappointing holiday season, mara ca sharaschiavocampo has tt story. >> reporter: last minute sales. early numbers show the lowest growth in years, many still found a way to buy for everyone on their list. one of the most popular ways to shop, online. >> online was the big surprise. early indications showed they're in 16%, 17% growth rates and that's big news for them. >> big ticket items brought in big bucks. flat screen tvs, laptops and tablets all did well early on. the gift that stepped out above the rest didn't even make the top ten last year, shoes. >> the big surprise this holiday season was the footwear business. running shoes did really well. classic sneakers did really well. >> reporter: with th
house. >> yes. mrs. bush, very elegant, very beautiful decorations. she copied her mother in law's signature look, the snowy trees in the grand lobby throughout the white house. when we were working on it, they'd say more snow, less snow, more snow. the first lady had a vision, and she really communicated it to us, and we finally got it right. it was perfect. >> very quickly want to talk about bo, the first family's dog. >> he's a real celebrity at the white house. this year we have bo-flakes. if you go through, you should find the ornaments that have bo's paw prints on them. there are bo sculptures and bo cookies. he is a big, big part of the white house at christmas. >> colleen christian burke, the book is called "christmas with the first ladies, the white house decorating tradition from jacqueline kennedy to michelle obama." what a great idea. i wish you the best of luck with this book and merry christmas. >> merry christmas. >> thanks so much. >>> ahead on "starting point," eight days left to make a deal. does president the obama want to go off the cliff? why some say that's
of the country turned to something else. it's interesting. if you look at 1968, mrs. johnson, lady bird johnson, wrote in her diary, there are so many people across this country who are asking what is happening to us. president johnson felt that as well, and that's when he moved on gun control. and i think, again, that if president obama wanted to use this moment he must do so i think with great swiftness. >> can i just ask you about the lbj library, which i understand opened yesterday, reopened after a big old renovation? what do you guys have there? >> well, we have a $10 million redesign of our core exhibit on president johnson. one of the wonderful things about the exhibit is we use the telephone recordings that were done throughout the course of president johnson's administration to help tell the story of this very consequential and important president. >> well, i think that's great. i also understand you have historians doris kerns good win and mark besh losh, michael beschlo beschloss, who are good friends of this show. we love to come and hear them. good to speak with you, mark updegrov
of need. that's what we've always done, and that's what we must do now. i yield the floor. a senator: mr. president? the presiding officer: the senator from connecticut. mr. blumenthal: thank you mr. president. i want to first begin by thanking my colleague from maryland senator mikulski, for her very kind and generous words about the recent tragedy that we suffered in connecticut and her sense of compassion and kindness in the remarks that she just made but also thank her for her vision and courage and leadership on the legislation before us and associate myself with the very eloquent and powerful remarks made by both senators from new york and the senator from new jersey today and i want to strongly oppose the amendments that would constrict and delay aid that is vital to connecticut as it is to the other states of the region that was hammered and pummelled by storm sandy in the night that it hit our area. the scope and scale of destruction made it one of the largest natural disasters to affect our nation. it left millions of people without homes or electricity. it cost tens of billion
: the leader. mr. reid: i ask unanimous consent the call of the quorum be terminated. the presiding officer: without objection. mr. reid: mr. president, i rise today to honor a woman by the name of janice shelton. for her friendship, and 32 years of dedication as an employee of this body, the united states senate. 25 of those years janice worked as my executive assistant. she's demonstrated a sincere dedication to me, my office, my family, and this body, the united states senate. it's an understatement to say that she will be sorely missed. she will be. she's always been kind and thoughtful to me, to my wife landra, all my children, and to everyone that she comes in contact. if there's a problem, everyone knows, go to janice. no one has my ear the past 25 years like janice shelton has. she has been a professional career creating order where there could easily be chaos. over the course of her productive career with the army, the white house, and the senate, have been each -- each benefited from her unique expertise and professionalism and hard work. she began her professional life at the dep
to this very important conference, and i want to express my gratitude to you and to dr. volkow for her leadership, director control kousky and his new deputy directer, mr. leibowitz, thank you all for being leaders, and a special thanks to dr. johnston because monitoring the future is a treasure for public health, so it's a great pleasure for me to be here. in examining the results that are being unveiled today, we should remember that of all these agents, that tobacco remains the leading cause of premature and preventable death in the united states. smoking kills more than 1200 americans every day, and for every tobacco-related death there are two new replacement cigarette smokers under the age of 26. it's tragic that these replacement smokers are kids who start when they are not fully ready to make an informed choice. and, indeed, you have heard -- and it is true -- that tobacco addiction is a pediatric disease. three out of fourteens who smoke continue to smoke into adulthood, even though they intend to quit, and a typical smoker loses 13-14 years of precious life. so today we annou
you expect mrs. clinton will say she can get beyond this? >> i think that remains to be seen. we just don't know what secretary clinton knew, what she approved, did her political deputy protect her? did he keep information from her because he is a very political guy? clearly has been a loyal soldier to secretary clinton, so did he cover up? that's a huge question of whether or not her deputies kept things from her to protect her, or if she knew about these cables and she made the decision. we need to know these answers. >> those are the questions that the members of congress may or may not be asking when they have these hearings. rick, thank you for your time. happy holidays and merry christmas. >> you too, eric. >> we'll see what happens. >>> fox news alert. i'll take this one. routers reporting dozens have been killed or injured in an uh syrian -- on a see yen airstrike on a bakery. new video just into fox. some are reporting 200 are dead or hurt. here you go. this is just a little while ago. the strike hit a town recently seized by rebels in a new push to take territory in the hama
. it probably was exactly the wrong time pause of his weakened condition. >> mr. bush is the country's oldest living president. his doctors are cautiously optimistic. >> david lee miller, thank you. >>> the head of the environmental protection agency, lisa jackson, is leaving her post. in a statement, she said she will leave the epa confident the ship is sailing the right direction. the president released a statement praising lisa jackson for taking steps to protect our air and water, helping to combat climate change and passing new fuel economy standards. republican lawmakers and industrial groups often accused her and the epa of killing jobs, making it harder for american companies to compete on the world stage. >>> every year thousands of american families save russian children from horrific conditions but that could stop. critics say it's all because russia's president is making a political ploy. we speak with a family about their efforts to adopt a russian child and what the move means to them. pot pie soup and it's so rich and creamy... is it really 100 calories? let me put you on webca
're so fine you blow my mind hey mickey, hey mickey >>> mr. strahan? yes, yes. no, it wasn't me. >> get it fixed! >> i'm going to pass on her cell number. thank you, michael. love you, bro. >> i will take you. i will go with you. >> cheerleading is about more than just wearing a really short skirt and a big smile. you also have to be a good speller. >> actually rob, you might be surprised. >> really? >> cheerleaders these days are pretty amazing athletes and fierce competitors. abc's juju chang has more. >> reporter: it takes flipping out to a whole new level. >> oh! >> if you fall again, i'm going to replace you. >> reporter: tlc's new show, "cheer perfection," brings us inside the rough and tumble world of competitive cheerleading. >> that's the worst basket toss i've ever seen in my life. that was terrible, absolutely terrible. >> reporter: alicia dunlap is head coach and co-owner of cheer time revolution in arkansas. it's her job to make little girls into little champions, no matter what it takes. >> come down. everybody run because of cameron and cassidy. >> reporter: even her own
been grateful to have. especially in her darkest hours, men who lead by example and who expect nothing in return. mr. reid: mr. president, i -- the presiding officer: the majority leader. mr. reid: yes, i didn't mention -- i should have, but i'm really -- have been waiting the last hour or so to make sure that it was okay with his wife that i came here and said something, so i haven't had time to do much other than feel bad about senator inouye. as i indicated, i talked to irene. i wasn't able to talk to ken, but i did talk to irene. i want to make sure that everyone understands the depth of my feelings -- i'm speaking for the entire senate. he believed in me more than i believed in myself, many, many years ago, a couple decades ago, he said, you know, you're going to do great things in the senate, always talked about my leading the senate, and he always came and said,, oh, always -- you did the right thing by telling you that you did the right thing. the chapter of inouye in the senate is something that is remarkable. not only his military record but what he did with the defense aspec
senior during the period, before he graduated and left, only one person can remember her at all. the others constantly never saw. so \mr.{-|}\mister, what was that? she left. >> how long was she in seattle? >> guest: about a year and a half it as a single mother with, yes, and she had babysitters and she went to school part-time. got herself back together. that first semester at university of wide was the difficult because she got pregnant. so she had to sort of reveal herself on academically, and she did at the university of hawaii. and after barack, sr. had left hawaii to go to harvard, she and little barrie came back. >> host: 1962-19 safety seven they were back in honolulu. who was her second husband? >> guest: her second husband was another international guy. he was in indonesia. she met him at the university of hawaii. he was from the east-west center. brought americans the honolulu to prepare to go to asia for study. and that's where she met him. he was a tennis player. she fell in love with lolo. >> host: at what point did the move to jakarta? >> guest: he went back firs
not want to be identified. i said mrs. obama said she knows that the slave owners runs through her veins and she said that we were of the wrong side of history. it seems like a long time ago but it is not. >> host: in fact, you were able to work with to distant cousins. one is black and one is white fade did not know they were related but as a result of your research, they assisted. tell us about your relationship to each other and the book. >> guest: to have a contemporary narrative i thought what the book is about was the sweep of american history through one family with modern-day people grappling these two women i was trying to find the white ancestors and we thought it was someone in the slave owner family. i search for as many descendants as i could and the son of dolphus. i went back and forth to see these women of the family. they were older who really wanted to know. even though they knew what they found out would not be easy. >> host: have they rejected the story or is a universal embrace? the shields a family being the lineage represented by the former slave owner. >> guest: t
saying, we can't go back to school, we can't go back to school. our teacher is dead. mrs. soto, we don't have a teacher. and i couldn't believe it. >> reporter: the school nurse told abc's george stephanopoulos how she crouched under her desk and held her breath. >> while you're under there, you actually see the feet of the shooter? >> i could see him from the knees down. see the legs. >> right in front of you? >> 20 feet away, facing -- his boots were facing my desk. >> then he turned and walked away? >> it was seconds. he turned and walked out. and i heard the door close. >> reporter: and for the rabbi, the tough task of explaining to the faithful where the evil that struck last friday comes from. >> i don't believe that god did this. i believe a crazy man did this. the meaning in it is not trying to understand why god does something. somehow we got here. we have to not necessarily always look towards god but look towards humanity and say what is it that we've done that has created this environment. >> reporter: the clergy of the small new england town say that the horrors of last we
. i join with the entire senate family in wishing her and john the very best in the years ahead. mr. president, in these closing days of the 112th congress, the senate is saying farewell to again one of our most popular and respected members, senator jeff bingaman of new mexico. when jeff came to this body 30 years ago, he had already led a life of accomplishment created in small-town new mexico, silver city. he was an eagle scout, graduated from harvard college, stanford law school, where he met his future wife, ann. while at stanford, he worked in senator robert f. kennedy's campaign for president. at the age of 35, he was elected new mexico attorney general in 1978. and four years later at the age of 39, elected to the united states senate. during his three decades in this body, jeff bingaman has been a classic workhorse senator as opposed to being a show horse senator. he is truly remarkable and distinctive among senators for his willingness to shun the limelight and share the credit in order to get important things done for his state and for this country. senator bingaman has b
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